Full article [[Dissel, M.C., Probert, D.R., Tockenbuerger, L. (2007) Selling new technologies: Making a convincing business case, IEEE Engineering Management Conference,Singapore|/static/files/MBI/Module%204/Selling%20new%20technologies%20making%20a%20convincing%20business%20case.pdf]]

''Marketing and selling new technologies''
# ''The marketing aspects of technologies''
## Distinguish between:
### marketing of technologies itself (intangible)
### marketing of technology related products and services (tangible)
## Difference between selling know how and selling a product
### ''Intangibility''. Companies often do not realize they actually have saleable technologies in their portfolio.
### ''Conflict of interest in R&D management''. The buying element of technologies often rests with engineering staff which could have a conflict of interest as they themselves have not been able to develop the technology.
### ''Distribution'' of know how ''is fundamentally different'' from distribution of tangible products.
#### Unlike a product, know how can be built up but is also highly perishable. Hence the deliveryis difficult to define and carries legal implications as well.
#### Some mechanisms they identified to deliver know-how are licensing and franchising.
### ''Market identification is different'' as the sale tends to be a one-off and the sales environment is associated with highly confidential situations.
#### Again middlemen might be required to mediate between buyer and seller
### ''Pricing presents additional complexities''
# ''How are technologies adopted?''
## Rogers uses:
### Innovators
### Early adapter
### Early majority
### Late majority
### Laggard
<html>
<img src="/static/files/MBI/Module%204/rogers-bell.jpg" width="400" /> 
</html>
## [[Moore|/static/files/MBI/Module%206/READINGS_Moore_2000.pdf]] extended this by claiming that for technology firms the uncertainty is most visible during the transition in adoption characteristics from early adopters to early majority. He refers to this as the problem of crossing the “chasm”.
<html>
<img src="http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d3/Technology-Adoption-Lifecycle.png" width="500" /> 
</html>
### Whereas 2.5% of the market is immediately prepared to adopt new technologies (and some are even willing to pay a premium to do so), followed by the 13.5% of early followers,
### it is much more difficult to address the early majority. The transition is thus a very unsettled phase. The gap also implies a change  in market attitude towards the innovation.
### Whereas early adopters are interested in business opportunities, the early majority is more conservative and is mostly interested in improvement from a productivity perspective.
## The authors of the article claim that these curves also apply to sales of new technologies to large firms.
## In similar fashion as the product-market combination for traditional sales it is the role of the seller to establish the correct technology-product combination in order to convince the potential customer.
# ''How can we value a technology?''
## Quantitative Techniques
### Most techniques are quantitative in nature and are derived from financial valuation techniques and decision theory, such as the use of [[Discounted Cash Flow]][10], [[Decision Trees]] and [[Real Options]] analysis. For new technologies these approaches can be mathematically sophisticated but contextually naïve
### When the technology is already uncertain in its potential application appealing to the ‘‘early majority’’, i.e. for example clearly showing the productivity improvement potential, an even more sophisticated but equally nontransparent method of evaluation could end up in ensuring that the buyer will not be interested.
## Qualitative Techniques
### Another category of techniques focuses more on the qualitative aspects of valuation.
### Examples are the use of score cards and roadmaps
''Integrating Consultative Sales in Making The Technology Business Case''
# ''Consultative versus Manipulative Sales''
## Traditional sales
### Also referred to as manipulative sales
### Focused on convincing customers on why the need a certain product
### The product is the focus, not the customer needs, objectives, hopes and desires
## Consultative sales
### In contract consultative sales are non manipulative.
### Focus on customer needs and objectives
### Need to get into the customer business to learn what makes them 'tick'
# ''Consultative sales: uncovering the technology problem combination''
## Also known as 'adaptive sales'
## Very suitable for selling new technologies
''Illustrative cases''
# Understand:
## Functional Requirements
## Understand Buying centre/ Stakeholders
## Interests
## Assumptions
## Expectations
## Relationship
## Emotive aspects
# Jointly develop:
## Ideas
## Structure and visualise knowledge
## Enable involvement
## Solution oriented dialogue
# Present:
## Business case: convincingly, unambiguously, briefly, and understandable
## Jointly developed ideas/ solution (buy-in)
## Go – no go decision
bag
mbi_public
created
Mon, 27 Dec 2010 18:06:00 GMT
creator
dirkjan
modified
Mon, 27 Dec 2010 18:06:00 GMT
modifier
dirkjan
tags
Article
creator
dirkjan