A Customer Value Proposition is a way to help customers "get a job done", in other words to solve a fundamental problem in a give situation:
* The more important the job is to the customer, the lower the current satisfaction with getting it done and the better your solution is, the greater the 'CVP'.
* Opportunities for a CPV are most potent when alternative products and services have not been designed with the real job in mind.
The most important attribute of a customer value proposition is its precision: ''How perfectly it nails the customer job to be done'' - and nothing else. But such precision is the most difficult thing to achieve. A helpful way to identify precise customer value proposition is to think about it in terms of the most important barriers to get something done:
* Insufficient ''//wealth//''
* Insufficient ''//access//''
* Insufficient ''//skill//''
* Insufficient ''//time//''
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Part of [[M8-S2 - Reading - Mark W. Johnson, Clayton Christensen, and Henning Kagermann, Reinventing your business model]]
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businessmodelling_public
created
Fri, 14 Jan 2011 12:52:00 GMT
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dirkjan
modified
Fri, 14 Jan 2011 12:52:00 GMT
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dirkjan
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M8
creator
dirkjan